National Initiative Sites Absorb Lessons on Implicit Bias

“In the weeks before the 2018-19 school year dawned, police officers, procedural justice trainers, and School Resource Officers (SROs) from numerous National Initiative for Building Community Trust & Justice (NI) sites absorbed their own formative classroom lessons—on implicit bias and reconciliation. In Texas, this meant a two-day peer exchange in August dedicated to improving SRO interactions with […]

Forward Promise Appoints Prestigious National Advisory Committee

Forward Promise, a national grant-making program that supports the health of boys and young men of color, today announced the members of its National Advisory Committee (NAC). A diverse group of national leaders in the fields of health, education, youth advocacy, technology, psychology, business and philanthropy will guide Forward Promise in its efforts to help […]

The Black Boys & Men: Changing the Narrative

The Black Boys & Men: Changing the Narrative podcast series brings together thought leaders from the public and private sectors to analyze stereotypes and dispel myths concerning Black boys and men, while providing facts and best practices for those working with these often marginalized populations. The series calls into question issues of systemic racism and oppression and […]

From Policing to Policy

In 2014, Luther Tyus was finishing his sixth year as an officer with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. He had become well known within the department, winning accolades like the Meritorious Service Citation and Citizen’s Service Award for his work to build trust between officers and local communities. He had organized a series of police-run events, such […]

Why Didn’t I Kill Him?

Editor’s Note: Luther O. Tyus is a graduate research assistant in the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, as well as an eight-year veteran of the St. Louis Police Department and a certified Peace Officer Standards and Training police instructor. The views expressed in this commentary are his own. The first time I almost killed a […]

‘Build the village that raises the child’

HomeGrown STL rallying cry: ‘Build the village that raises the child’ By Jill Young Miller More than 120 people working to improve the lives of black boys and young men in St. Louis participated in the second annual HomeGrown STL Summit on February 8 at the Brown School of Social Work. “Build the village that […]

HomeGrown STL featured in the St. Louis American

Sean Joe developed Home Grown STL as a response to moving to St. Louis to take a faculty position at Washington University in August 2014 – the same month of the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown Jr. Home Grown STL is a research project that consists of networking events with local professionals to seek […]

Regional Summit featured in Center for Social Development News

The HomeGrown STL Inaugural Summit, February 9 at the Brown School, drew about 120 people committed to improving the lives of black boys and young men in St. Louis City and County. “Equity and economics are different sides of the same coin,” said Joe Reagan, president and CEO of the St. Louis Regional Chamber, in […]

Disparities in Educational Experiences of Black Youth

A more comprehensive picture of mental health that includes subjective well-being and other positive mental health characteristics could lead to more successful educational experiences among black youth, finds a recent study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. “We demonstrated the need to use a dual-factor model of mental health among adolescents […]

HomeGrown STL nearing action ‘on the ground’

​HomeGrown STL is close to putting its strategy for collective impact to work in St. Louis. The project, part of the Center for Social Development’s Race and Opportunity Lab, aims to support the social mobility of black boys and men between the ages of 12 and 29 in St. Louis City and County. “We want […]

How I learned to be a leader by Jerrel Sibert

On September 23, 2005, a black male was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and my parents named me Jerrel Sibert. Growing up I was a pretty privileged black kid who always had a lot of toys and entertainment. So I never knew the issues that were going on around me in my own city, like […]

Investment in black males pays off by Kelvin J. Taylor Sr.

While 66 percent of African-American children live in single-parent households, black students attend disproportionately underfunded schools, and black juveniles are 5 times more likely to be incarcerated than their white counterparts, we are neither predisposed nor destined for bad outcomes. The black men in my circle are pastors, bankers, philanthropists, successful entrepreneurs, corporate officers and […]

Beyond fear of the black male by Curtis O’Dwyer

On August 15, 2014, the day after celebrating new beginnings by proposing to my wife, I returned to my city in turmoil. Many mourned the death of Michael Brown. The raw footage on the news and social media outlets depicted outrage and uprising. Ferguson was in a state of emergency, and I was only five […]

Saving our sons – and all our students by Michael P. McMillan

As the new school year begins we need to see what has changed in our educational system, especially for African Americans. For the first time in many years, the responsibility of educating students is returning to the states. The U.S. Department of Education has approved Missouri’s state plan for public education under the Every Student […]

The black man who survived education by Luther O. Tyus

I will never forget what my Riverview Gardens elementary principal, Denis Dorsey, told my parents. He told my parents that I wasn’t smart enough for college. I didn’t have what it took, he said. I was in the second grade, and I had already developed a healthy dislike for school.  Sure, I wasn’t a model […]

Learning to beat the cheat by Mike Jones

When I was 12 or 13 years old, my father gave me some advice that became the compass for my journey through this American life. He said, “Michael, if you’re going to gamble, the first thing you have to do is learn to cheat. Not so you can cheat people, but so you’ll know when […]

My journey to training responsible fathers by Halbert Sullivan

  During my religious upbringing, I was taught, “Train up the child in the way they should go and they will not depart from it.” These words help set the foundation for the work I do. I believe that effective parenting plays a major role in the emotional and psychological development of a child. Children […]

Fathers Support Center helped Mark Seymore double his income by Jordan Wade

‘He just needed someone to point him in the right direction’ Mark Seymore grew up in a neighborhood that police have labeled as one of the highest crime areas in the region, around Page and Goodfellow boulevards in North St. Louis. “There wasn’t a lot of role models or anything positive to follow,” Seymore said. […]

When black men stop smiling by Stefan Bradley

“How’s the team going to be this year?” was one of the first questions I heard as I began my college career at a private predominantly white institution (PWI). To be fair, I am relatively tall, so I accommodated the query of the friendly white student. I said that the team would be great and […]

How 400 days in Ferguson changed my life by Bruce Franks Jr.

August 9, 2014 changed my life. That date is burned into our memory as the day Michael Brown was killed. But it’s also the date my son, King, turned 1. So we’re getting ready for his get-together – blowing up balloons, firing up the barbecue – when my social media starts going crazy. I get […]

I. Am. A. BLACK. Man. by Rev. Starsky D. Wilson

  Fifty years ago, a group of under-appreciated, underpaid black men who kept the city of Memphis healthy by purging its streets of waste, refuse and trash had to remind elected leaders and city fathers that they were indeed human. They held placards in public calling for basic dignity, stating simply “I Am A Man.” […]

Reimagining St. Louis for young black males by Sean Joe and Chris King

Four years ago to the day of our publication date – on August 9, 2014 — a Ferguson police officer shot and killed an 18-year-old black male named Michael Brown. A grand jury convened by St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch considered whether this police officer, Darren Wilson, should be charged with a crime for […]

Policing and Social Trust

Policing and social trust Guest Columnists: Luther Tyus Humans are a social species. The need for trust is rooted in our DNA. In times of peril and uncertainty, trusting relationships provide a sense of security. Trust helps us to survive………

Black Males, Trauma, and Mental Health Service Use: A Systematic Review

Black Males, Trauma, and Mental Health Service Use: A Systematic Review Robert Motley and Andrae Banks (2018) Washington University in St. Louis Objective To systematically review the evidence of and synthesize results from relevant studies that have examined barriers and facilitators to professional mental health service use for Black male trauma survivors ages 18 and older. Methods […]

Why Didn’t I Kill Him?

Editor’s Note: Luther O. Tyus is a graduate research assistant in the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, as well as an eight-year veteran of the St. Louis Police Department and a certified Peace Officer Standards and Training police instructor. The views expressed in this commentary are his own. The first time I almost killed a […]

Police More Likely to Use Force Against Higher Income Black Women

A new study  by Robert Motley Jr. a doctoral student and Sean Joe, the Benjamin E. Youngdahl Professor of Social Development at the Brown School of Washington University in St. Louis, examines the use of force by police officers when factors such as race, gender and income are taken into account. The researchers examined 2011 data […]

From Policing to Policy

In 2014, Luther Tyus was finishing his sixth year as an officer with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. He had become well known within the department, winning accolades like the Meritorious Service Citation and Citizen’s Service Award for his work to build trust between officers and local communities. He had organized a series of police-run events, such […]

‘Build the village that raises the child’

HomeGrown STL rallying cry: ‘Build the village that raises the child’ By Jill Young Miller More than 120 people working to improve the lives of black boys and young men in St. Louis participated in the second annual HomeGrown STL Summit on February 8 at the Brown School of Social Work. “Build the village that […]

The Black Boys & Men: Changing the Narrative

The Black Boys & Men: Changing the Narrative podcast series brings together thought leaders from the public and private sectors to analyze stereotypes and dispel myths concerning Black boys and men, while providing facts and best practices for those working with these often marginalized populations. The series calls into question issues of systemic racism and oppression and […]

Police Use of Force by Ethnicity, Sex, and Socioeconomic Class

Police Use of Force by Ethnicity, Sex, and Socioeconomic Class Robert O. Motley Jr. and Sean Joe (2018) Objective Disparities in police responses to Black and White people have received significant research and public attention in recent years. This study examines self-reported accounts of exposure to and perceptions of police use of force among Black […]

HomeGrown STL nearing action ‘on the ground’

​HomeGrown STL is close to putting its strategy for collective impact to work in St. Louis. The project, part of the Center for Social Development’s Race and Opportunity Lab, aims to support the social mobility of black boys and men between the ages of 12 and 29 in St. Louis City and County. “We want […]

Disparities in Educational Experiences of Black Youth

A more comprehensive picture of mental health that includes subjective well-being and other positive mental health characteristics could lead to more successful educational experiences among black youth, finds a recent study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. “We demonstrated the need to use a dual-factor model of mental health among adolescents […]

Forward Promise Appoints Prestigious National Advisory Committee

Forward Promise, a national grant-making program that supports the health of boys and young men of color, today announced the members of its National Advisory Committee (NAC). A diverse group of national leaders in the fields of health, education, youth advocacy, technology, psychology, business and philanthropy will guide Forward Promise in its efforts to help […]

Black Youth Mental Health & Educational Experiences

Mental Health and Educational Experiences Among Black Youth: A Latent Class Analysis Theda Rose, Michael A. Lindsey, Yunyu Xiao, Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, and Sean Joe (2017) Highlights Objective of the study was to examine the associations between mental health and educational experiences among Black adolescents. Higher school bonding is strongly associated with having better mental health. […]

Community Violence Exposure and Risk Taking Behaviors

Community Violence Exposure and Risk Taking Behaviors Among Black Emerging Adults: A Systematic Review Robert Motley, Whitney Sewell, and Yu-Chih Chen (2017) Highlights High levels of exposure to community violence is a predictor of substance abuse Mixed study results concerning both the relationship between community violence exposure and violence perpetration and the relationship between community violence […]

Regional Summit featured in Center for Social Development News

The HomeGrown STL Inaugural Summit, February 9 at the Brown School, drew about 120 people committed to improving the lives of black boys and young men in St. Louis City and County. “Equity and economics are different sides of the same coin,” said Joe Reagan, president and CEO of the St. Louis Regional Chamber, in […]

HomeGrown STL featured in the St. Louis American

Sean Joe developed Home Grown STL as a response to moving to St. Louis to take a faculty position at Washington University in August 2014 – the same month of the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown Jr. Home Grown STL is a research project that consists of networking events with local professionals to seek […]

Suicide Risk Among Urban Children

Suicide Risk Among Urban Children  Sean Joe, Andrae Banks, and Rhonda Belue (2016) Highlights Ethnic group identity or categorization of human beings is not a good indicator of suicide risk. Children under 12 should be examined similarly for suicide risk regardless of age. Screen all urban children at PES expressing symptoms of intentions to self-harm […]